MOULD 2018’S NEW AND IMPROVED FORMAT

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Were you at MOULD – A Cheese Festival in 2017? You were? We hope you had a gouda time. We thought it was grate, especially for an inaugural event. But we want to make 2018 even fetta!

It’s why MOULD will run over THREE sessions in Melbourne this year: A Friday evening session on May 4 (5-9pm), and a day time (11am – 4pm) and an evening session (5-9pm) on Saturday 5 May.

We know how much you guys love cheese. Last year, we invited the country’s best cheesemakers and mongers to come together for a day of tastings, masterclasses and demos, and you all came out in droves to meet them and try their stuff. The makers themselves were so thrilled to see how many of you turned up; although admittedly, they were a little overwhelmed at times.

So this year, to make it easier on them, us, and you, we’re offering more sessions but capping the number of tickets available at each. So there is the same amount of tickets on sale as last year, but because we’re splitting them over three sessions, it means there’ll be less people in each. Less people = less waiting around and much, much more cheese for you.

Again, we’ll have a bar stocked with a range of awesome wines, whiskies, gins, beers, ciders, sakes and more, all selected for their individual cheese-matching abilities. We’ll also have some of the city’s best cheesemongers, chefs and restaurants dishing up some delicious cheesy dishes.

We hope you’ll be back to help us MAKE MOULD GRATE in 2018!

MOULD – A Cheese Festival Returns for 2018!

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After a successful inaugural 2017, MOULD – A Cheese Festival is back for 2018, returning to Melbourne for the second year running, and heading to Sydney for the first time.

Presented by REVEL (the team behind cult wine event Pinot Palooza) in collaboration with cheesemaker and Milk Made author Nick Haddow of Bruny Island Cheese Co., MOULD is a celebration of the Australian cheese industry.

The best artisan cheese producers from around the country – including Bruny Island Cheese Co., Yarra Valley Dairy, Shaw River Buffalo Cheese, Grandvewe, Stone & Crow and many more – will come together for tastings, conversations, demonstrations, and masterclasses.

Demand from the cheese-crazed crowds was so high in 2017, that in 2018, MOULD will operate over multiple limited-capacity sessions. In Melbourne, session one will run from 5pm to 9pm on Friday 4th May, and sessions two and three will run from 11am till 4pm and 5pm till 9pm respectively on Saturday 5th May. In Sydney, two sessions – 11am till 4pm and 5pm till 9pm will run on Saturday 1st September.

Alongside tastings of the best Australian cheeses, each festival session will also feature a food program, with the likes of Maker & Monger, Harper & Blohm and Burn City Smokers serving up cheesy dishes for purchase in Melbourne. Sydney’s food program is still to be confirmed.

To wash down all the cheese, drinks will be available to purchase in both cities from the well-stocked, highly curated bar. Local wines, whisky, beer, cider and sake will all be available; each one chosen for its cheese-pairing characteristics.

Tickets are on sale now for $45 + BF. The price of admission includes a Plumm wine glass, glass of wine from the bar and unlimited tastings of the best Australian cheeses.

MELBOURNE

DATE: Friday 4th (5pm – 9pm) and Saturday 5th May (11am – 4pm and 5pm – 9pm)
VENUE: Meat Market, 5 Blackwood Street, North Melbourne

SYDNEY

DATE: Saturday 1st September (11am – 4pm and 5pm – 9pm)
VENUE: Bay 25, Carriageworks, Eveleigh

BUY TICKETS HERE!

Wine and Cheese Matching is (Generally) Gross. Discuss.

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Most people would agree that wine and cheese is the perfect pairing, but in reality, the two don’t often work together. In some cases, the combination is positively gross.

First, a disclaimer. Let us acknowledge that drinks pairing is very personal. You are, of course, entitled to do what you want, and this is as much opinion as it is science.

Still, we’re not sure who decided that cheese and wine were meant for each other, and when. Wine writer and delicious. magazine drinks editor Mike Bennie thinks it was borne from convention, fostered by lack of imagination, and encouraged by a perpetuation of classic wine and food thinking (i.e., cheese comes at the end of a meal when the heavy reds do, too). Wine educator and writer Clare Burder thinks that we took the few wine and cheese pairings that do work and concluded that they all do.

But consider this.

“When you eat cheese, you get a lactic build-up in your palate, which ends up negating a lot of the nuance in wine,” says Bennie. “If you’re drinking a big red and you have a cheddar alongside it, the creaminess of the cheddar will end up staining your palate in a way that means you won’t be able to appreciate the wine. Nor will the wine be able to cut through that creaminess in order to refresh your palate and encourage another mouthful.

“It creates a sluggish, pleasure-less experience, like stuffing cottage cheese through fishnet stockings. It’s just not the right combo in terms of the way things fit in your mouth.”

Burder agrees. “Pairing wine and cheese is largely a disservice to both,” she says, especially with wines that are high in tannin. “Tannins in wine bind with the fat in cheese, leaving everything else behind and forcing the cheese to dissolve in the wrong way in your mouth.”

Soft cheeses in particular can make red wine taste metallic, thanks to trace compounds of iron in wine which can bind to aldehydes (a type of organic compound) created during the cheese fermentation process.

Bennie and Burder both believe there are much better pairing alternatives (namely beer, cider, sake and whisky), but for those of us who want to keep the wine and cheese dream alive, it’s not completely hopeless. There are a couple of pairings that work well.

One of the most famous is Comté and Vin Jaune (“Yellow Wine” made from white Savagnin grapes), both from the Jura in France. Vin Jaune is made in a similar way to sherry (although Vin Jaune is unfortified), and like sherry and some dry vermouth, its intensity and pungency can stand up to cheese. It is, says Bennie, “the most sublime food and drink pairing in the galaxy.” It’s also a reason why we kept the bar offering at MOULD on the funky side.

More conventional wine and cheese pairings exist, too. Sauvignon Blanc and fresh goat’s cheese is a firm favourite of Burder’s, and she also believes that there’s room for success between Chardonnay (although be careful with oak) and white mould cheeses. Sparkling wine can also work really well, thanks to a hint of sweetness and the cleansing cut-through of its bubbles.

While white wines tend to be a safer bet than red, fruity reds can often do the trick, and this comes down to sugar. “The savoury, umami, salty flavours in cheese are elevated by sugar,” she says, so, like eating cheese with quince paste, pairing cheese with a wine that’s on the sweeter side can really work well.

Whatever you do though, and disclaimer aside, avoid big reds and cheddar. “The classic, men-in-suits-kind-of-dining always crescendos into a slab of cheddar and a big, thick, rich Shiraz,” says Bennie. “That is fucking horror. It’s sumos fucking. It’s no good.”

Some combinations to try:

Yarra Valley Dairy Fresh Pyramid with Sauvignon Blanc
Yarra Valley Dairy Gentle Goat with a Yarra Valley Pinot Rosé
Yarra Valley Dairy Le Jack white mould with Serrat Chardonnay (current vintage)
Yarra Valley Dairy Fresh Ashed Goats Pyramid with Dappled Appellation Chardonnay (current vintage)
Yarra Valley Dairy White Savourine with Dappled Appellation Gewurztraminer (current vintage)
Yarra Valley Dairy Yering (camembert) – Steels Gate Blanc de Blanc
Yarra Valley Dairy Bullseye + St Ronan’s Methode Traditionale Apple Cider
Binnorie Dairy Labneh or Feta with a young Hunter Valley Semillion
Comté and Vin Jaune or other oxidative wine
A washed rind cheese with red vermouth
 

Images courtesy of Yarra Valley Dairy

 

 

 

 

People’s Choice 2017

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Picking a favourite cheese at the first ever Mould: A Cheese Festival, was a bit like picking a favourite child! Each was delicious in its own way. But, you still managed to vote for your favourites. Here’s your Top Five for 2017.

  1. Shaw River Buffalo
  2. Tolpuddle Goat Cheese
  3. Milawa Cheese
  4. Bruny Island Cheese Co.
  5. Coal River Farm